History will most likely – and hopefully – remember this 20 September 2019 as the day when the fight for climate justice finally took centre stage, when thanks to courageous and visionary young people it was no longer possible to ignore the fact that climate change is an existential threat that must be taken very seriously.

On this occasion, and while hundreds of thousands of people – mainly students, but joined by their parents, by trade unionists, media workers, people from all walks of life – marched through the streets of places as far apart as Sydney, Nairobi, Delhi or London, Saint Lucian poet, dramatist and activist Kendel Hippolyte once again issued his call for artists throughout the world to add their voice to the cry for climate justice.

"We cannot - CANNOT - look at our children and grandchildren and say we did nothing or we did not know what to do. Whatever artistic gift we have - and whatever rewards it brings or we hope it will bring - will not mean a thing if all we hand over to our descendants as we leave is a planet which is their funeral pyre even while they are alive,” says Hippolyte in his call.

This call is part of a campaign launched in 2015 at the initiative of Panos Caribbean to raise awareness about the threats posed by climate change and to support the position of Caribbean countries calling for urgent action so as to ensure that average global temperatures do not rise more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above what they were two centuries ago.

The campaign works closely with musicians and other artists, and Kendel Hippolyte explains why it is important for artists to become involved in the fight for climate justice: “it is important,” he says, “because artists can make you feel, and when you feel something, that’s when you want to act”. 

In this second video, Kendel Hippolyte expresses his hopes and his belief in the role artists and young people can play to save our planet.

 

Earth Day, 22 April 2019. As part of the #1point5toStayAlive Campaign that supports Caribbean and other vulnerable countries in the fight against climate change, Panos Caribbean has produced a new theme song, with lyrics by Saint Lucian poet and dramatist Kendel Hippolyte and music by musician and humanitarian Taj Weekes, who coordinated the production on behalf of Panos Caribbean.

This video is part of a series of videos produced by Panos Caribbean, in the context of COP24, to highlight the human and social justice dimensions of climate change. It focuses on the relationship between gender and climate change, and looks in particular at the impacts of climate change on women and men, at the role of women in responding to these impacts, and at the contribution of women to the global fight for climate justice.

It features 4 Caribbean heroines in the global fight against climate change: Ambassador Dessima M. Williams, former Chair of AOSIS 2009-2011; UnaMay Gordon, Director of the Climate Change Division for the Government of Jamaica; Judith Wedderburn, Gender & Development Practitioner; and Dizzanne Billy, climate activist with the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN).

 

 

UnaMay Gordon, Director of the Climate Change Division for the Government of Jamaica, tells us how policies must consider gender when they are crafted.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

 

UnaMay Gordon, Director of the Climate Change Division for the Government of Jamaica, tells us about the necessity to look at the issues of climate and gender together.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

 

UnaMay Gordon, Director of the Climate Change Division for the Government of Jamaica, tells us how you can't make policies without the involvement of the people that will be affected by them.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

 

Dizzanne Billy, a young climate activist with the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN), tells us how women are strong and show resilience in the face of the difficult conditions imposed on them by climate change.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

 

Dizzanne Billy, a young climate activist with the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN), tells us how anyone can apply their skills to do what they can to contribute to climate action.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

 

Dizzanne Billy, a young climate activist with the Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN), tells us how the youth will inherit the consequences of climate actions being taken right now.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

 

Gender & Development Practitioner Judith Wedderburn, tells us how gender roles in most societies are deeply ingrained, and that this does not change under the strains of extreme weather events.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

 

Gender & Development Practitioner Judith Wedderburn, tells us how women are expected to care for the family, and that under extreme weather events that burden becomes equally extreme on women.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

 

Ambassador Dessima M. Williams, Chair of AOSIS 2009-2011, tells us that what we need to overcome the climate crisis is less about financial or scientific capacities than about political will.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

Ambassador Dessima M. Williams, Chair of AOSIS 2009-2011, tells us how climate change implies that people's human rights are denied.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

Ambassador Dessima M. Williams, Chair of AOSIS 2009-2011, tells us how billions of dollars must be raised by 2020 to help the most vulnerable nations face the burden of the climate crisis it did not create.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.
 

Ambassador Dessima M. Williams, Chair of AOSIS 2009-2011, tells us how those who made the biggest contribution to the climate problem should make the largest contribution to the solution.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

2018 is another crucial year for global climate change negotiations, as Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change develop a work programme for the implementation of the Paris Agreement, and as efforts are being made to ensure that the 1.5°C target is eventually reached. In all the negotiation processes leading to and during the next meeting of the Conference of Parties (COP24) in December, the Caribbean needs to remain actively involved and to make its voice heard. In this video, regional experts Leon Charles and Spencer Thomas present the agenda for the coming weeks and months, and outline the challenges and the opportunities that the Caribbean must consider in order to secure a satisfactory outcome from forthcoming global negotiations.

 

 

The fight against climate change is almost absent from Haïti's political discourse. That worries Panos Caribbean and other members of the civil society.

 

Video in Creole & French, with English subtitles.

 

PKredbluelogoweb

image.pngPRESS RELEASE. Bonn, Germany. 13 November 2017.

“1.5 is a matter of necessity,” said University of the West Indies’ Professor Michael Taylor, speaking at an event convened by the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) as part of the Conference on Climate Change, COP23, taking place in Germany until the end of this week.