Small Island Developing States are among the most vulnerable to climate change. The islands and low-lying coastal nations of the Caribbean are no exceptions.

 

While elevated temperatures, sea level rise, changing rainfall patterns, more intense droughts, storms and ocean acidification pose grave risks to coastal lands, to water supply, to agriculture, to biodiversity, to fisheries and to other natural and human assets, climate change threatens the very existence of some Caribbean islands.

 

Caribbean countries, along with other island nations, are committed to the fight against climate change. In Paris, we need to ensure that the international community arrives at a robust new agreement that will guarantee their long-term survival.

 

WHAT THE CARIBBEAN WANTS

 

› A legally binding agreement, applicable to all, ensuring that greenhouse gas emissions tops at levels that will make the global average temperature to limits its increases to well below 1.5° Celsius by 2100.

 

› A new climate change agreement to ensure adequate, predictable and accessible climate financing to support adaptation, mitigation and other climate change-related needs.

 

› For Loss & Damages to be adequately adressed in this new agreement.

 

 

C AND HIGHER = DISASTER

110,000 throughout the Caribbean will loose their home

1300 sq. km. will be lost to the sea

10 to 20% drop in annual rainfall

›Increase in storms and droughts

›Increased ocean's acidification

50% less fish catches

more vulnerable to food insecurity

Lost beaches and damaged resorts

huge job losses in the tourism industry

 

VIDEO SOURCE: CARIBBEAN COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE CENTER