15 NOVEMBER 2021

After two weeks of increasingly frantic negotiations, the gavel came down at 11.27pmon Saturday 13 November, making it the sixth longest COP on record. Vulnerable countries also left bitterly disappointed that their calls for a Glasgow “Loss and Damage Facility” were blocked by the US and EU. (See: Loss and Damage.) Yet despite question marks hanging over the COP26 pledges – and the processes kicked off by the Glasgow Pact – the outcome was widely seen as a step forward.

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13 NOVEMBER 2021

The high-stakes COP26 climate change talks in Glasgow concluded on Saturday evening with the strongest government commitments to fighting climate change in history. Yet they’re still not enough to meet the ambitious targets of the Paris climate agreement and stave off some of the worst consequences of global warming. 

It was not the massive course correction for the climate that activists were clamoring for. 

But unlike so many climate meetings in recent years, the negotiations in Glasgow did not collapse or produce only a tepid statement of consensus.

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12 NOVEMBER 2021

Finance has been one of the main sticking points throughout COP26 and, as yet, no significant breakthroughs have been made. This is one of the key areas the conference will be judged on, and much of the increasingly fraught, last-minute negotiations will centre on cold hard cash. These are the key areas to watch out for…

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12 NOVEMBER 2021 - ZICO COZIER / FRIEDRICH EBERT STIFTUNG

“For a long time, developed countries have resisted any effort to recognise loss and damage, because of the liabilities and potential claims for compensation that might emanate from that,” said Dr Colin Young, Executive Director of the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC).

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11 NOVEMBER 2021

“We have limited resources, we are throwing everything we have at achieving this, but we are running out of time to reverse the destructive environmental practices that are already having severe consequences for small island developing states.”

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10 NOVEMBER 2021 - ZICO COZIER

Trinidad and Tobago’s ambitions for cutting greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) are “not sufficiently bold” and based on “low-hanging fruit”, head of the Energy Unit at the Caricom Secretariat Dr Devon Gardner has said.

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10 NOVEMBER 2021

Republic Group in collaboration with New Energy Events has announced the launch of the inaugural Caribbean ESG (Environment, Social and Governance) and Climate Financing Summit to be held on November 17 to 18.Republic Group in collaboration with New Energy Events has announced the launch of the inaugural Caribbean ESG (Environment, Social and Governance) and Climate Financing Summit to be held on November 17 to 18.
In a statement the group said the importance of sustainable business practices is now more apparent in all the Republic Group’s markets and as such there is need to increase its involvement and support in this space.
The main aim is that this summit will bring together Caribbean borrowers, lenders and investors and act as a catalyst in the creation of a new financing ecosystem, it added.

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11NOVEMBER 2021

For as long as there have been international climate talks, Saleemul Huq, a botanist from Bangladesh, has quietly counseled diplomats and activists from the global south on the prickliest question: What is owed to countries least responsible for the problem of global warming but most harmed by its effects — and by whom?

This year, there’s a big shift.

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“The term ‘loss and damage’ is a euphemism for terms we’re not allowed to use, which are ‘liability and compensation,’” Mr. Huq said. “‘Reparations’ is even worse.”

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10 NOVEMBER 2021

At a surprise announcement in the waning days of the COP26 summit, the world’s two largest emitters — China and the United States — said they would work together to slow warming during this decade and ensure that the Glasgow climate conference ends in success.

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10 NOVEMBER 2021

To be considered a success, CoP26 negotiations will need secure aggressive GHG emission reduction commitments from the world’s largest emitters, or as Palau’s President, the Honorable Surangel Whipps Jr told the CoP: “… [y]ou might as well bomb us [poorer, smaller and most likely to be affected countries.]”

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