17 October 2021

CARIBBEAN COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE CENTRE (CCCCC)

The Glasgow Climate Change Conference (COP26) takes place during what the region describes as a historic time with multiple crises and a rapidly closing window of opportunity for an effective global response.

→ READ MORE ON CCCCC'S WEBSITE

IDERA.briefingnote.cop26

With only a few days left before the start of COP26, the International Development Empowerment and Representation Agency (iDERA) has released a very useful and comprehensive briefing note that presents the main positions and expectations of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in forthcoming negotiations. On 14 October, iDERA and the University of York’s Environmental Sustainability Institute (YESI) hosted a webinar during which this note was presented and discussed.

In the invitation to the webinar, the organisers wrote that “there have been many ‘pre-COP’ events, but this one will be different and meaningful. It will not be experts lecturing; nor will it entail the rehashing of national positions; rather it will offer the opportunity for Representatives, Officials, scholars and experts to jointly explore new thinking and approaches that hopefully will contribute to positive outcomes for SIDS, and by extension, the rest of the world”. 

This was actually the case, as the discussion chaired by iDERA’s Edwin Laurent produced very concrete and relevant ideas. We are pleased to share and recommend the briefing note, as it is indeed different and meaningful, at a time when too many of the ‘pre-COP’ events and position papers appear satisfied with very general statements and recommendations that are not directly linked to what will be on the negotiating table in Glasgow. 

→ DOWNLOAD IDERA'S BRIEFING NOTE, "SURVIVAL OF SMALL ISLANDS: WILL COP26 DELIVER?" (PDF DOCUMENT)

12 October 2021

Blog by Gladys Habu, youth climate advocate from the Solomon Islands

GLADYSHABU

I have been advocating for climate action for over half my life and I still do not believe we are doing enough. Instead, what I am seeing is political division.

Our islands are sinking. Our people are being displaced. Our children are going hungry. Our communities are becoming unhealthy and dying.

→ READ & WATCH MORE ON THE COMMONWEALTH'S WEBSITE

13 October 2021

CASA - Climate Ambition Support Alliance

logo casa min

Two leading spokeswomen from the High Ambition Coalition of countries, which is advocating for ambitious outcomes from the UNFCCC talks, have today set out their expectations of what COP26 should deliver for the world.

 

Andrea Meza Murillo, Minister of Environment and Energy of Costa Rica, and Tina Stege, Climate Envoy of the Republic of Marshall Islands, today held a joint conference where they underscored that:

 

The highest-emitting countries must strongly enhance their national climate plans, the Nationally Determined Contributions in advance of COP26;

Finance for climate action must be approached in a holistic, whole-of-economy fashion, in every country;

Respect and preservation of human rights through climate-related actions should be a paramount principle.

→ READ MORE ON CASA WEBSITE

12 October 2021

Ayesha Constable, co-founder of GirlsCARE and guest-blogger for CANARI's “Caribbean Voices for Climate Justice” seriesCaribbean Voices for Climate Justice” series

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for accurate and accessible information to inform public decision-making, similar to what is needed for individual climate action. Similarly, the policy measures taken by government are in line with what is required legislatively to bar actions that drive climate change. In addition, the disparity in access to vaccines by rich and poor countries is analogous to the access to climate finance and technology. If the vaccine scenario serves as a blueprint for the climate experience, then we ought to be very concerned. It is safe to say that measured bilateral support or negotiations will not secure the resources required to build Caribbean country’s resilience to climate change. At some point, the esoteric response to the climate crisis, like that of COVID-19, from a standpoint of diplomacy and consensus, must give way to fairness, equity and justice.

→ READ ON CANARI'S WEBSITE

4 OCTOBER, 2021

"Aurora Herrera reports on the formidable climate challenges facing the Caribbean, the progress some small islands states in the region have made against climate goals, and people's hopes and expectations for COP26.

 

The Caribbean population has been experiencing the effects of increasing global temperatures for decades. Government and civil society experts have been asking for the resources to adapt to and mitigate the effects of a changing climate, but global funding mechanisms have not been effective.

 

Now the latest International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report has underscored the gravity of the situation, many Caribbean countries hope that the plight of the most vulnerable states will be at the forefront of the upcoming climate negotiations in Glasgow."

→ READ MORE ON COMMONWEALTHFOUNDATION.ORG

GlasgowDialoguesCommunique

The Glasgow Climate Dialogues, four online sessions held between 6-9 September 2021 and designed to engage with, learn from and platform key Global South stakeholders on climate change ahead of COP26, resulted in a communiqué that summarises the outputs of these Dialogues, and is intended to provide valuable inputs to COP26 negotiations.

 

This constructive, convincing & articulate document provides an uplifting window into the needs of the Global South at the upcoming COP 26. It includes input from Caribbean allies such as the Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI), the Alliance of Small Islands States (AOSIS) and CARICOM.

 

Each session, co-hosted by the Scottish Government and Scottish civil society, focused on a specific theme: Access, Participation and Voice; Adaptation and Resilience; Loss and Damage; and Just Transition.

→ READ THE GLASGOW CLIMATE DIALOGUES COMMUNIQUÉ HERE

Via Caribbean Natural Resources Institute - CANARI

Dr. Adelle Thomas, Ph.D., Caribbean Science Lead, Climate Analytics & Senior Fellow, University of The Bahamas

CANARI adellethomas blogpost 092021

Climate justice highlights that the causes and impacts of climate change are neither distributed nor experienced equally and that there are structural, systemic and historical factors that have led to these inequities. Although climate justice has been a key advocacy issue for many years, the term has only recently become recognised in mainstream climate change discussions.

→ READ FURTHER ON CANARI WEBSITE