12 NOVEMBER 2021 - CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

“While negotiators are in hot pursuit of a quick conclusion they are continuing to undermine their commitments to upholding human rights while opening a Pandora’s Box of false climate solutions that will only serve to blow a hole in ambition. Once governments strike a deal on this, there will be no do-overs. And negotiators must think carefully about what they are doing before it is too late. If they can’t get it right in Glasgow, they should pause negotiations rather than pass an irreversible threat for communities in the Global South and future generations.”

→ READ MORE ON CIEL

12 NOVEMBER 2021 - OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT INTERNATIONAL

The climate conference is described as the “whitest and most privileged ever”. (...) One exception was Prime Minister of Barbados Mia Mottley – described as a ‘regional rockstar’ after an inspiring opening speech, and the Amazonian activist Txai Suruí who brought attention to the devastating deforestation of the Amazon. Afterwards, Txai shared that she was nervous to speak in a foreign language (English) to a mostly white, male audience.

→ READ MORE ON ODI

8 NOVEMBER 2021

PM of Barbados Mia Mottley kicks off open & honest discussion to deepen understanding of #LossAndDamage and ways to avert, minimize and address it.

Even with a rapid scale-up of adaptation action, climate change will still have an impact. So the risk of losses and damages from climate change is growing. This session will bring together experts to deepen our understanding of loss and damage as well as debate how we can take practical actions to avert, minimise and address loss and damage.

→ WATCH ON UNFCCC WEBSITE

5 NOVEMBER 2021 - SANDRA MASSIAH

Every day, whether it is during or outside of the hurricane season, people who live and work in SIDS know only too well that climate change is a reality and that it affects everything that they do. Workers especially feel first-hand the impact of increasingly intense hurricanes, floods, longer periods of drought, and intense heat. Public services workers are on the frontlines responding to the impact of the climate crisis. And perhaps better than anyone, they know that there is a very high price to pay for inaction.

→ READ MORE ON CANARI

4 NOVEMBER 2021 - Dr. JAMES FLETCHER

Prime Minister Mia Mottley delivered the speech at COP26 that all negotiators from Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have been waiting and yearning to hear a SIDS head of government deliver on our behalf for years. She hit on all the right points, she spoke with the authority and confidence of someone who understood the subject, she commanded the stage and she delivered with a passion and eloquence that caused every international leader and celebrity in the audience to listen with rapt attention.

cop26.daily9 

11/11/2021

➡️ COP26, WHAT HAVE YOU DONE FOR ME?

#COP26 #Ambition #ClimatyeFinance #LossandDamage

2 NOVEMBER 2021

We, Heads of State and Government, and high representatives, of the Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF) from Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, the Middle East, and the Pacific, and forming a significant number, and a representative group, of those countries most vulnerable to the adverse impacts of climate change, meeting in-person and virtually, as convened from Dhaka, and in Glasgow during the World Leaders Summit of UNFCCC COP26, in October and November 2021,

 

Alarmed at the recent findings of the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment report (AR6) which confirmed that the warming of the climate system is accelerating with the world on track to reach 1.5ºC as early as 2030, with certain adverse impacts of climate change, such as extreme heat spells, set to nearly double in scale by then compared to impacts at 1ºC, as society now finds itself firmly within an escalating climate emergency,

 

Further alarmed at the conclusions of the UNFCCC Secretariat’s 2021 reports on Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) under the Paris Agreement, wherein a large number of parties to the Agreement, including a number of major emitting countries, failed to comply with the Agreement by updating or renewing enhanced NDCs, and whereby a major shortfall in contributions to limiting warming to 1.5ºC prevails, though highlighting that the 1.5ºC goal can still be kept alive if 2030 emissions are 45% below their 2010 levels, which requires drastic, constant and urgent ambition raising especially of major emitting countries prior to 2030,

 

All the more alarmed by reports of the unmet UNFCCC collective climate finance commitment of the developed countries to mobilize $100 billion in annual, additional climate finance, with balanced funding for adaptation and mitigation, from 2020, and the threat that this default poses for confidence in the Paris climate regime in addition to weakening support for climate action by developing countries and our member states,

→ READ THE FULL DECLARATION ON THE CVF WEBSITE

GASTON BROWN - ANTIGUA & BARBUDA

ANDREW HOLNESS - JAMAICA

 CNN / Christiane Amanpour Interview - 1 November 2021

1 NOVEMBER 2021 - Caribbean Natural Resources Institute (CANARI)

The 26th Meeting of the Conference of Parties (COP26) to the UN Climate Change Convention in Glasgow, UK represents a critical moment to tackle the climate crisis and set us on the pathway to a low carbon and resilient future. CANARI joins other activists and civil society organisations across the globe in calling for urgent and strengthened commitments to limit global temperature increase to 1.5C and address the needs of the most vulnerable communities and countries including Caribbean small island states.

 

28 OCTOBER 2021

A new report, the State of Climate Action 2021, looks at whether we are doing enough to achieve the Paris Agreement’s goals. It finds that, to date, none of the 40 indicators assessed are on track to reach 2030 targets. 

→ READ MORE ON WORLD RESOURCES INSTITUTE'S WEBSITE

27 OCTOBER 2021

caricom logo

As the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) readies itself for participation in the upcoming global Climate Change conference, COP 26,  it issued a pre-Conference Declaration this week giving notice  that the Region faces a climate emergency and demanding action.

 

The CARICOM Declaration on Climate Change, approved at a meeting of CARICOM Ministers with responsibility for Climate Change, made an urgent call for unswerving global solidarity to deliver ambition, timely action, and support for a just transition during this decade, with the aim of limiting global warming to well below 1.5°C.

 

The Declaration demanded climate justice and the assurance that the Region’s survival will not be compromised.  It called on leaders at COP26 to close the emissions gap, scale up finance particularly for the most vulnerable, and agree to rules to guide parties to progressively increase and demonstrate highest ambition.

→ READ THE FULL DECLARATION ON CARICOM'S WEBSITE

26 OCTOBER 2021

More than 300 civil society organisations sent an open letter to COP26 President Elect Alok Sharma and other world leaders demanding that COP26 urgently commit to deliver finance on Loss and Damage. 

AN OPEN LETTER TO WORLD LEADERS

We, the undersigned, from over 300 organisations from across the world, spanning a broad range of institutions and movements, from humanitarian and development organisations to youth groups, Indigenous Peoples organisations, trade unions and climate justice groups, call on you today to ensure that COP26 delivers finance for loss and damage.

→ READ THE FULL LETTER AND MORE ON CLIMATE ACTION NETWORK INTERNATIONAL'S WEBSITE

→ LEARN MORE ABOUT LOSS & DAMAGE WITH OUR EXPLAINER VIDEO FEATURING SAINT LUCIA'S DAWN PIERRE-NATHONIEL

17 October 2021

CARIBBEAN COMMUNITY CLIMATE CHANGE CENTRE (CCCCC)

The Glasgow Climate Change Conference (COP26) takes place during what the region describes as a historic time with multiple crises and a rapidly closing window of opportunity for an effective global response.

→ READ MORE ON CCCCC'S WEBSITE

IDERA.briefingnote.cop26

With only a few days left before the start of COP26, the International Development Empowerment and Representation Agency (iDERA) has released a very useful and comprehensive briefing note that presents the main positions and expectations of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) in forthcoming negotiations. On 14 October, iDERA and the University of York’s Environmental Sustainability Institute (YESI) hosted a webinar during which this note was presented and discussed.

In the invitation to the webinar, the organisers wrote that “there have been many ‘pre-COP’ events, but this one will be different and meaningful. It will not be experts lecturing; nor will it entail the rehashing of national positions; rather it will offer the opportunity for Representatives, Officials, scholars and experts to jointly explore new thinking and approaches that hopefully will contribute to positive outcomes for SIDS, and by extension, the rest of the world”. 

This was actually the case, as the discussion chaired by iDERA’s Edwin Laurent produced very concrete and relevant ideas. We are pleased to share and recommend the briefing note, as it is indeed different and meaningful, at a time when too many of the ‘pre-COP’ events and position papers appear satisfied with very general statements and recommendations that are not directly linked to what will be on the negotiating table in Glasgow. 

→ DOWNLOAD IDERA'S BRIEFING NOTE, "SURVIVAL OF SMALL ISLANDS: WILL COP26 DELIVER?" (PDF DOCUMENT)

12 October 2021

Blog by Gladys Habu, youth climate advocate from the Solomon Islands

GLADYSHABU

I have been advocating for climate action for over half my life and I still do not believe we are doing enough. Instead, what I am seeing is political division.

Our islands are sinking. Our people are being displaced. Our children are going hungry. Our communities are becoming unhealthy and dying.

→ READ & WATCH MORE ON THE COMMONWEALTH'S WEBSITE

13 October 2021

CASA - Climate Ambition Support Alliance

logo casa min

Two leading spokeswomen from the High Ambition Coalition of countries, which is advocating for ambitious outcomes from the UNFCCC talks, have today set out their expectations of what COP26 should deliver for the world.

 

Andrea Meza Murillo, Minister of Environment and Energy of Costa Rica, and Tina Stege, Climate Envoy of the Republic of Marshall Islands, today held a joint conference where they underscored that:

 

The highest-emitting countries must strongly enhance their national climate plans, the Nationally Determined Contributions in advance of COP26;

Finance for climate action must be approached in a holistic, whole-of-economy fashion, in every country;

Respect and preservation of human rights through climate-related actions should be a paramount principle.

→ READ MORE ON CASA WEBSITE

12 October 2021

Ayesha Constable, co-founder of GirlsCARE and guest-blogger for CANARI's “Caribbean Voices for Climate Justice” seriesCaribbean Voices for Climate Justice” series

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the need for accurate and accessible information to inform public decision-making, similar to what is needed for individual climate action. Similarly, the policy measures taken by government are in line with what is required legislatively to bar actions that drive climate change. In addition, the disparity in access to vaccines by rich and poor countries is analogous to the access to climate finance and technology. If the vaccine scenario serves as a blueprint for the climate experience, then we ought to be very concerned. It is safe to say that measured bilateral support or negotiations will not secure the resources required to build Caribbean country’s resilience to climate change. At some point, the esoteric response to the climate crisis, like that of COVID-19, from a standpoint of diplomacy and consensus, must give way to fairness, equity and justice.

→ READ ON CANARI'S WEBSITE

4 OCTOBER, 2021

"Aurora Herrera reports on the formidable climate challenges facing the Caribbean, the progress some small islands states in the region have made against climate goals, and people's hopes and expectations for COP26.

 

The Caribbean population has been experiencing the effects of increasing global temperatures for decades. Government and civil society experts have been asking for the resources to adapt to and mitigate the effects of a changing climate, but global funding mechanisms have not been effective.

 

Now the latest International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report has underscored the gravity of the situation, many Caribbean countries hope that the plight of the most vulnerable states will be at the forefront of the upcoming climate negotiations in Glasgow."

→ READ MORE ON COMMONWEALTHFOUNDATION.ORG