Ambassador Dessima M. Williams, Chair of AOSIS 2009-2011, tells us how billions of dollars must be raised by 2020 to help the most vulnerable nations face the burden of the climate crisis it did not create.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.
 

Ambassador Dessima M. Williams, Chair of AOSIS 2009-2011, tells us how those who made the biggest contribution to the climate problem should make the largest contribution to the solution.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

2018 is another crucial year for global climate change negotiations, as Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change develop a work programme for the implementation of the Paris Agreement, and as efforts are being made to ensure that the 1.5°C target is eventually reached. In all the negotiation processes leading to and during the next meeting of the Conference of Parties (COP24) in December, the Caribbean needs to remain actively involved and to make its voice heard. In this video, regional experts Leon Charles and Spencer Thomas present the agenda for the coming weeks and months, and outline the challenges and the opportunities that the Caribbean must consider in order to secure a satisfactory outcome from forthcoming global negotiations.

 

 

The fight against climate change is almost absent from Haïti's political discourse. That worries Panos Caribbean and other members of the civil society.

 

Video in Creole & French, with English subtitles.

 

BC2 Yvonne Budraham 2 web 1Yvonne ‘Donna’ Budraham started out as a hotel worker in Jamaica’s tourism industry upon graduation from high school. She worked long and hard hours, and longed for the day when she would be able to spend more time with her children.

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Source: Adaptation Fund


 

CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK, 6 NOVEMBER, 2017

CDBreportClimate resilience is a critical priority as the Caribbean Region seeks to protect development gains already achieved and to address the specific challenges and opportunities presented to improve resilience in a range of sectors; particularly, infrastructure (roads, airports, ports, coastal and river defences), tourism, agriculture and renewable energy and energy efficiency. Climate resilience is a key priority in the Caribbean Development Bank’s (CDB) work and investments. CDB has been actively improving the resilience of its portfolio in climate-sensitive sectors such as water, agriculture and physical infrastructure. CDB mobilises and facilitates access to concessionary resources from global partners to help its BMCs finance the effective implementation of policies and investments as part of their wider sustainable development programme.

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SOURCE CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

SOURCE CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK