Ambassador Dessima M. Williams, Chair of AOSIS 2009-2011, tells us how those who made the biggest contribution to the climate problem should make the largest contribution to the solution.

This video is part of a series produced by Panos Caribbean and its 1.5 to Stay Alive initiative, in the context of COP24, 2 to 14 December 2018.

2018 is another crucial year for global climate change negotiations, as Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change develop a work programme for the implementation of the Paris Agreement, and as efforts are being made to ensure that the 1.5°C target is eventually reached. In all the negotiation processes leading to and during the next meeting of the Conference of Parties (COP24) in December, the Caribbean needs to remain actively involved and to make its voice heard. In this video, regional experts Leon Charles and Spencer Thomas present the agenda for the coming weeks and months, and outline the challenges and the opportunities that the Caribbean must consider in order to secure a satisfactory outcome from forthcoming global negotiations.

 

 

The fight against climate change is almost absent from Haïti's political discourse. That worries Panos Caribbean and other members of the civil society.

 

Video in Creole & French, with English subtitles.

 

BC2 Yvonne Budraham 2 web 1Yvonne ‘Donna’ Budraham started out as a hotel worker in Jamaica’s tourism industry upon graduation from high school. She worked long and hard hours, and longed for the day when she would be able to spend more time with her children.

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Source: Adaptation Fund


 

CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK, 6 NOVEMBER, 2017

CDBreportClimate resilience is a critical priority as the Caribbean Region seeks to protect development gains already achieved and to address the specific challenges and opportunities presented to improve resilience in a range of sectors; particularly, infrastructure (roads, airports, ports, coastal and river defences), tourism, agriculture and renewable energy and energy efficiency. Climate resilience is a key priority in the Caribbean Development Bank’s (CDB) work and investments. CDB has been actively improving the resilience of its portfolio in climate-sensitive sectors such as water, agriculture and physical infrastructure. CDB mobilises and facilitates access to concessionary resources from global partners to help its BMCs finance the effective implementation of policies and investments as part of their wider sustainable development programme.

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SOURCE CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

SOURCE CARIBBEAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

image.pngPRESS RELEASE. Bonn, Germany. 13 November 2017.

“1.5 is a matter of necessity,” said University of the West Indies’ Professor Michael Taylor, speaking at an event convened by the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) and the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) as part of the Conference on Climate Change, COP23, taking place in Germany until the end of this week.

Prof. Taylor was at the time delivering the main results of a study funded by the CDB, a study that has brought together 45 Caribbean scientists from 11 regional institutions to examine and compare the implications of climate change for the region.

The facts speak for themselves. On average, the temperature on this planet has already increased by 1 degree Celsius over what it was before the world began to industrialise, and the impacts of that increase are there for all to see.In the Caribbean, global warming has already resulted in more intense hurricanes with stronger winds and much more rain, but it is also responsible: for increases in both air and ocean temperature; for more very hot days and nights; for longer and more frequent periods of drought; for an increase in very heavy rainfall events; and for sea-level rise and coastal erosion.

Climate change is real, and things can only get worse, but the question is: how much worse? This is the question that was at the centre of the climate change negotiations in Paris two years ago, and this is why the Caribbean considered it a success that the Paris Agreement made a commitment to an increase of “not more than 2 degrees”, trying to achieve the target of 1.5 degrees.


At the 2015 Climate Conference - COP21 - in Paris, the Caribbean released a theme song that calls on the world to recognise and respect the legitimate claims of small islands in the face of climate change.

With lyrics written by Kendel Hippolyte and music composed and produced by Ronald Boo Hinkson, this song stresses the need for greater climate justice and for a shared commitment to combat climate change.

This project has brought together several of the Caribbean's greatest and most conscious artists, as part of a regional campaign spearheaded by Panos Caribbean in collaboration with the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre, the Caribbean Development Bank and other regional partners.

Artists performing on the song: Banky Banx, BelO, Kendel Hippolyte, E.sy Kennenga, Jessy Leonce, Ace Loctar, Shayne Ross, David Rudder, Aaron Silk, Taj Weekes, and Deridee Williams.

HAITI

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

 

SAINT LUCIA

GRENADA (2015)

GRENADA (2015)

SAINT LUCIA (STEPHEN A. DANTES - 2015)

#1point5toStayAlive, the memes + shareable imges

3girls.cop26

meme.cop26.adellethomas.4

Bainimarama: No escape to climate change

meme.cop26.ProfTaylor.5

Figueres: Climate Change is a Public Health Emergency